books · non-fiction · tidying

Sparking Joy

This was the second book that I read by Marie Kondo and like her first book, I enjoyed it. I am a tidy person by nature so I was intrigued by this book to see how it added to her first debut book. KonMari gives some great suggestions especially when it comes to large spaces in the home like kitchens and bedrooms. Her methods are relatively easy to follow (although I have not mastered folding just yet!). I like her method of laying everything out in one space. Although daunting, it does work as I have mastered this with my clothing and footwear.

Because we are in such a consumer-driven culture in North America, her book is very refreshing. Do I really need all the stuff I have? Do I really need more stuff when I shop? Probably not. Because I am an avid reader, I found her “book” section the hardest to complete. I like to think of my books as old friends but KonMari does offer some excellent advice when it comes to the discarding method. When I look at the number of books that I have, in particular textbooks from classes I have taken for professional development, I realize that she is right. Why am I keeping these items? Time for the recycle bin.

Although her methods are not for every person, KonMari writes in an encouraging and thoughtful way. She even tackles a section in her book of almost a how-to live with other people’s stuff without losing your mind. She is a thoughtful writer and I appreciate her advice for sparking joy in the items that I already have.  GoodReads Review

poetry

Glorious Words

Poetry has been long criticized for not appealing to the masses but I tend to disagree.  Poetry can be a very unique voice in the world of words.  Sometimes there are rigid and forced rules and other times, poets reject all forms of rules and write freely.  One thing poetry is or at least should be to all people is voice.  A voice to condemn.  A voice to praise.  A voice to lament and a voice to share joy.

During my university days I indulged in poetry as often as my timetable would allow.  Although some of the courses I signed up for were compulsory, many were not.  I loved and still love the language of poetry.  I had forgotten that until recently.

Rupi Kaur is a Canadian woman of Punjabi descent who has rocked the literary world with her debut book of poems called milk and honey.  How sweet it was as I flowed through each page pausing and absorbing this woman’s voice.  The writing was lovely yet some of the poems were jarring and gave me pause as I murmured in agreement with the poems and their meanings.  It is not a book for everyone as the subject matter can be difficult — abuse, love and loss, violence and feminism.  And yet it is so necessary in our #metoo world to hear this poet’s fresh voice.

Evidently some literary purists have decided that Kaur is not a poet at all but I weep for them because they do not know what they are missing by ignoring this voice.  She paints with her words lovely and raw images of what it is like to be in a relationship both healthy and not.  She paints with those same words depression and sadness yet offers us light.

Kaur’s follow-up to the best-selling milk and honey is a beautiful collection called the sun and her flowers.  I ear-marked many pages in this book of poetry.  Parts of the book are clear declarations of her love for her mother but she also writes about loss and trauma as well as all forms of love.  One of my favourites in this collection is about time.

“…life does not stop for anybody / it drags you by the legs / whether you want to move forward or not / that is the gift…”

As Kaur writes, she gives a message of resilience and strength.  That we are more than we think we are.  Her poetry offers hope in a world of much despair.  the sun and her flowers is a great anthology separated into parts that include: “wilting”, “falling”, “rooting”, “rising” and “blooming”.  The flower(s) becomes this beautiful metaphor for her poetry and her exploration of self.

So I give thanks to Rupi Kaur for re-awakening the word-lover in me for I had forgotten she was there.  Will I still return to the classics like Wordsworth, Shelley, Browning and Keats in my well-worn 2652 page Norton Anthology of English Literature – The Major Authors that I lugged around campus all those years ago?  Yes I will but I will keep my eyes wide open for those new voices that have been calling my name.  It’s time I heard them.

books · education · literacy · reading · teaching

The Reluctant Reader

As the new school year begins I find myself preparing to face three classes of reluctant readers.  I am sure many of them will be feeling some anxiety and pressure as they enter my class for the first time this coming Tuesday.  They won’t be alone.

After three years away from a traditional classroom, I will be returning to a regular timetable, predictable hours and a steady prescribed curriculum.  I am nervous and anxious too!  However that being said, I am looking forward to connecting with my grade 10s and 12s who will be motivating me each day to get up and help them to find their writing and reading groove.

In my seventeen years of experience as a classroom teacher I have seen many changes especially when it comes to Ministry expectations and trends in education.  One thing that has not changed is the emphasis on reading and writing strategies; only the strategies have gotten smarter and better considering the teenage brain.  Research tells us that teenagers need sleep and a lot of it (9-10 hours a night) to function and pay attention in class.  For a classroom teacher and their students, the struggle is real.  I have to motivate and encourage those sleepyheads to read and write as early as 8:30 a.m.!  I’m in for a challenge because the students are already coming into the class with some pre-existing issues.  From self-esteem, to functional literacy skills and learning disabilities I will have my hands full.

A few strategies that I have picked up along the way are from author Marilyn Reynolds.  Reynolds first came to my attention at the beginning of my career as I was pursuing additional qualifications in Reading and Library.  Her approach to education is very refreshing as she has over 30 years’ experience working with at-risk youth.  Her book I Won’t Read and you Can’t Make Me: Reaching Reluctant Teen Readers published in 2004 is still relevant today.  Reynolds has helped me tremendously when working with both at-risk students and those who are unmotivated.

Some strategies she uses with success (and that I have adapted myself) include:

  • Respecting students including their experiences, attitudes and choices regarding what they choose to read
  • Helping students become accountable for their actions
  • Practicing reading and writing each day

I found that all the above strategies are incredibly helpful but the respect piece is most important for classroom success.  In my years as a teacher I have learned that all these young people come from all walks of life and each person has their own story to tell (or not).  This influences what is available to read in class.

IMG_2788One of the strategies that I have implemented is to visit the library on a scheduled and predictable basis to refresh the book collection and change up our day-to-day scenery.  I have students who only gravitate to graphic novels while others ask for specific authors that reflect a particular demographic like Sister Souljah’s Midnight series.  Other students have asked for only non-fiction books like the Ripley’s Believe It or Not Series or yearly National Geographic Almanacs.  I have also included Reynolds series of novels that she wrote that are geared towards young people including titles like Telling and Love Rules.

Further I found that timely feedback is so important to a reluctant reader and writer.  Whether they have just finished their first journal entry or written a paragraph, my feedback is key.  Students also like to be read to no matter how old they are.  I will often choose a novel or non-fiction piece that we can read a little each day.

I had tremendous success several years ago when I chose to read the story of Steven Truscott to my class.  At the time we were studying In the Heat of the Night by John Ball and I wanted the students to see that injustice can happen at any time and to any person.  Real Justice: Fourteen and Sentenced to Death by Bill Swan was the perfect pick for that class at that time.  Because I was working with so many students who had experienced troubled times like an arrest, they could relate to story.  They were particularly outraged at the sentence Truscott received because of his age.  I heard many of them exclaim, “That’s my brother’s age!” or “I was fourteen when I was accused of…”  We followed up the unit with some media footage of Truscott who was acquitted 48 years later.

As I get ready to merge back into the classroom I hope to implement some if not all of these strategies with my three classes.  The appeal to make it through the doors each morning with acceptance, respect and a treasure trove of reading materials that they may learn to love.

 

books · Canadian books · Canadians · dogs · library · reading · summer · witches

Summer Reads

As the summer comes to a close with the temperatures getting cooler each night and the sun setting a little earlier each evening, I think back on all the books I have read over this nine-week period.

Thirteen books have passed through my hands during the hot months of July and August and some were page-turners while others left me wanting for more.

I found these books in libraries, on my own book shelf and on the shelves of book stores, both big box and local and in an airport.  With each read I was transported to a different time and place depending on the genre of the book and the focus of the author.

The summer started with the novel by Canadian author Katherena Vermette who first came to my attention with a fantastic collection of very Canadian short stories.  I did not want to pass up her debut novel The Break and I was not disappointed.  Although I have already blogged briefly about this novel, I wanted to mention it again as I liked the characters and the stories.  A brief synopsis was shared with a friend of mine who asked what I thought of it:

“I really liked it. I had a hard time putting it down. I did have a hard time connecting to Stella and her inability to react. It was not the easiest subject to write about but the author did a good job in creating the different narrative voices to reveal each part of the story.”

As a dog lover I picked up two different novels completely by chance at my local public library in Hamilton at different points during the summer.  The first called Ordinary Dogs, Extraordinary Friendships: Stories of Loyalty, Courage and, Compassion is a non-fiction book that chronicles the amazing life and adventures of Pam Flowers and her trips into the Arctic with her team of sled dogs.  Her tales are harrowing at times and this would be a great read for young adolescents who happen to love dogs.  After reading this book, I had a greater respect for working dogs and the people who love them.

More recently I finished the short book Good Dog, Stay by renowned American author Anna Quindlen.  It is another account of dogs and their people; those who love them and bond with them.  I liked this book and Quindlen’s devotion to the different dogs that came into her life and bonded with her children with a focus on her Labrador retriever, Beau.  It is a sweet story for anyone who has had a dog and loved it and the heart-wrenching decision to put your dog down when it needs to end its’ suffering.  Get the tissues out for this one.

As the summer passed I made more time to read including a collection of short stories called Boundary Country by Tom Wayman.  Some of the stories I really liked as they often reflected my countries vast and varied landscape and climate.  This was my first introduction to Wayman who is otherwise known in the literary world as a poet.  He seems to have a keen grasp of the human condition as he writes each story sometimes using historical events to frame the narrative.

Into my hands came more Canadian authors including Margaret Laurence as I re-visited her writing style through The Fire-Dwellers and laughed out loud as I read through the highly recommended Home From the Vinyl Café: A Year of Stories by Stuart McLean.  Although both authors are deceased, each book reminded me of the greatness of some of my country’s authors and how incredibly Canadian a book can be.  The narrative, the setting and even the dialogue is uniquely my country’s own as I read through each book.

I also found myself reading a few graphic novels as the summer went on.  One I was extremely excited to find, as it had been on my “to-read” list on GoodReads for some time.  Roz Chast’s Can’t We Talk about Something More Pleasant? was one of the best reads this summer.  The subject matter is sad and depressing but how Chast presents the true story of her parents aging and eventual deaths is so authentic.  The cartoons are fantastic as she chronicles her parents and their eccentricities.  As a person who has lived through the experience of watching a parent die as a result of a chronic illness some of what Chast says is relatable.  Although my father died at the early age of 64 and Chast’s parents live into their nineties, the relatability is similar.  I really recommend this book to anyone who is at this stage in their life where the roles are reversed and one is caring for an aging and/or dying parent.  An uncomfortable topic to be sure, but Chast’s wit and genuine reflection on this terrible time in an adult child’s life is written with true compassion and care.

The lazy month of August came and I flew through Miller’s Valley when I ran out of something to read while travelling back from Las Vegas.  This was my first Anna Quindlen novel.  I had always wanted to read something by this much celebrated American author but opportunity to do so never materialized.  The novel started slow but gained some momentum as the family saga played out focusing on protagonist Mimi Miller.  It is a cautionary tale related to water sustainability while Quindlen creates both likeable and unlikeable characters for the reader to absorb.  I was pleased with this book and will read more of Quindlen’s work.

While in beautiful Las Vegas I was continuing to read Into the Water which I had started before we left for our trip. The much-anticipated follow-up novel from best-selling author Paula Hawkins had me intrigued.  I had heard a podcast (Q) on CBC radio where Hawkins was interviewed and discussed her writing and the incredible success she received following her excellent debut novel Girl on the Train (which I loved!).  I did like the novel as it read much like a mystery, but it is so hard for any author to follow the kind of success from a stellar debut like Girl on the Train.

The last two books I wanted to blog about in this post are very different from each other.  The Witches of New York is by Nova Scotia author Ami McKay who I know from her terrific first novel The Birth House.  McKay is an author I really like.  She incorporates quite a bit of historical information into each story and this novel is no exception referencing the horrific Salem witch trials (Into the Water referenced the trials too).  All three protagonists are very different but oh so likeable!  The book is filled with beautiful illustrations and poetic verses and witches’ spells that all add to the story.  I was sorry when it was over.  McKay’s imagination and the ability to weave together an engaging tale is a true gift.IMG_3110

The last book for this blog post is another book that I had wanted to read but kept missing.  A Number of Things: Stories of Canada Told Through Fifty Objects should be mandatory reading in all Canadian schools.  Jane Urquhart is a Canadian author who weaves together a historical and engaging account of fifty objects that connect to Canada all neatly illustrated by Canadian Scott McKowen.  Not every Canadian would have chosen the same fifty objects that Urquhart did but they are good choices that tell a story of our nation coming together to become the country that it is today, and will continue to be as the world changes.  I liked this book because Urquhart does pick some strange things like a tractor and a shoe, but the more the reader reads, the clearer the reasoning is for her choices. I learned new tidbits and facts about my country.IMG_3219

As the summer comes to a close and I get ready to head back into the classroom, I will have new books to share with my students and family.  Now to get to that list for Autumn…

books · Canadian books · reading

The Great White North: The Importance of Reading your Country’s Authors.

My country recently celebrated 150 years.  Canada Day celebrated on July 1st each year offers Canadians a chance to celebrate their heritage, our flag, our uniqueness and each other, often with the help of a 2-4 (case of beer for you non-Canadians out there).  Like any country that celebrates a birthday we Canadians pulled out all the stops for this big birthday bash.  I happened to be celebrating with my family at our trailer in Ontario.  There was a big fireworks show at dusk; a bike race where the kids and adults could show off their pride with red and white decorations and flags.  Most people were also dressed up in red and white for the day and weekend.  If you were fortunate to be in our nation’s capitol for the festivities (Ottawa) like my cousin was, Canadians were in for one heck of a fireworks show!

Aside from National Pride, Canadians have much to celebrate when it comes to acknowledging our amazing writing talent both past and present.  As a young child I fell in love with Anne of Green Gables by beloved Canadian author L.M. Montgomery.  Anne had red hair like me and she spelled her name with an “e” just like my middle name. Although I was not an orphan, I sometimes believed I was after the horrid tales my sister would tell me about how I fell off a turnip truck or came from outer space.  Anne is a character that any child could relate to.  She got in trouble for silly things, had a crush, turned beet-red after being embarrassed, and had challenges growing up.  I remember a highlight in my twenties was finally going to P.E.I. to Green Gables!  Oh how I loved the idyllic setting and seeing Anne’s house up close along with learning so much about L.M. Montgomery.  Montgomery created other characters aside from Anne Shirley but she will be forever one of my favourite childhood heroines.

In university I was introduced to one of my all-time favourite Canadian authors Alice Munro.   Lives of Girls and Women was part of the syllabus in first year English at the University of Western – Brescia College in London, Ontario.  What an incredible pick from my professor!  This book was love at first read and I went on to read everything Munro has published since.  Munro has a very unique writing voice.  Her characters and plot lines are very relatable yet also uniquely Canadian.  She uses real towns as the backdrop for many of her stories and her incredible use of observation skills adds a richness to her stories.

Like Munro, Carol Shields is also a favourite Canadian author.  As a teen, I first found her through her novel The Stone Diaries.  Shield writes in the raw.  Her stories unfold through the eyes of characters who are faced with sometimes terrible circumstances and tragedy as is the case in her novel Unless.  Shields created characters who are vulnerable when they need to be but also funny and sweet.  She is also the author of short stories which happens to be one of my favourite genres.  I have always liked her writing as she created very memorable stories and characters.

Recently I have consciously tried to read novels and works from Canadian authors when I can.  Elizabeth Hay is a newer favourite as is Stuart McLean, Farley Mowat, Richard Wagamese, Tracey Lindberg and Heather O’Neill.  These authors all write in a very different voices with different stories to tell yet each time I finish one or all of their published books, I leave with something new to think about.  It might be a new perspective on a social issue, a story that has been lost, or just the pure enjoyment of reading.

Most recently I finished The Break by Canadian author Katherena Vermette.  I first came across Vermette’s writing on the shelves of my local library.  Her short story collection North End Love Songs beckoned to me.  As a fan of short stories I was not disappointed. Her stories reminded me of my hometown and the people in it although it takes place in Winnipeg’s North End.  Contrary to the title, these stories were not all sunshine and roses but gritty tales that could be ugly at times.  When I saw that she had published a novel, I had to buy it. I really liked it and I had a hard time putting it down. I did have a difficulty connecting to her one character Stella and her inability to react.   The subject could not have been easy to write about but Vermette told a captivating story by creating different narrative voices to reveal each part of the story.  She will be a writer I will continue to seek out and read. 

There is a great benefit in reading the authors that come from your own country.  In this blog post I have only captured a minute snapshot of those Canadians I admire.  Whether you find a writer who tells real tales or fictitious ones, it is worth reading those voices.  It is a great way to “see” and experience the country from varying perspectives.

books · genre · memoir

Tell Me Your Story – the reading of a memoir

In the past 12 months I have moved into the genre of memoir largely due to the monthly picks from my book club.  This is a category I normally would not seek out yet I am so glad that these books found their way into my life.

The feature photo for this blog post had been on my “to read” list for a very long time.  Although the majority of the members of my book club did not enjoy Jeannette Walls’ memoir The Glass Castle, I found myself incredibly intrigued by her story as parts of it felt surreal.  Unconventional is not even an appropriate word to describe Walls’ up-bringing and the fact that she overcame such incredible obstacles and wrote the tale, is remarkable.  Children truly need rules, boundaries and security.  Yet Walls and her siblings (most of them) managed to grow up “normal” contrary to what the Western world views as a normal childhood and suitable parenting.  I often thought as I read through her memoir that this book would be an excellent read for the sociology class I used to teach.

Further our book club dove into the very Canadian memoir of Farley Mowat’s last book titled Otherwise.  Here Mowat tells the tale of his early childhood through to the mid-1940s after his experience in WWII. Wow did this man ever lead of life of adventure!  Although my Canadian childhood was not as exciting as Mowat’s I could relate to his treks into the wilderness and encounters with insects, snakes and other forest critters as I has the privilege of spending my summers in Long Point, Ontario.  I liked Mowat’s memoir because of not only the adventures that he wrote about but also his true passion to seek justice for isolated indigenous peoples and how he contributed so much to science.  His writing is vivid and he writes this memoir with such clarity and purpose that I could see the other characters and animals as each adventure was told.

During a trek to Hamilton’s Public Library (hpl.ca) I found an intriguing title: Smoke Gets in Your Eyes: And Other Lessons from the Crematory by Caitlin Doughty.  Not your typical memoir Doughty discussed working in a crematorium in her twenties.  This memoir was fascinating in both how much I learned about this field, but also how funny it was.  Death is not a subject that is usually associated with humour but Doughty managed to make the anecdotes quite hilarious at times.  I liked this memoir because I learned about a subject that I was very unfamiliar with without feeling the discomfort that the subject of death usually creates in people.  It was truly a fascinating read.

The fourth memoir that found its way into my hands was Lindy West’s Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman.  I really liked this book.  It was empowering, relatable and very truth driven.  West is a woman who does not mince her words but most definitely gives a voice to topics of feminism, fat-shaming, internet harassment, rape and equality to name a few. This memoir may not appeal to everyone but I thought it was a worthwhile read as she tackled many taboo and controversial subjects (which as an aside is ridiculous that some of those topics are still taboo in the 21st Century!)  I am looking forward to what West publishes next.

The last memoir that I read I finished at the end of June.  I was a hard read but such a necessary book in our culture that is slowly eroding.  Roxane Gay is an author I have come to respect and admire.  Thank you to bookriot.com for featuring her writing across my Facebook feed.   Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body was an ultimate memoir for me.  I could relate to much of what Gay shares in this raw memoir.  Her story breaks my heart yet at the same time I can relate to hiding in the fat — when you are fat no one notices you (ironically) or bothers you sexually.  Her story is about safety and her own recognition of self-destruction. She writes with honesty opening herself up to tell a story that needed to be told.  I feel like her book came at exactly the right time.  It is hard to understand what it means to be fat unless you lived or are living that life and to see it through Gay’s lens is eye-opening.  I would urge people to read this memoir to take a look through that lens, if only to empathize with a fraction of what Gay faces each day.

So there you have it.  Five compelling and uniquely different memoirs that have come my way in the past 12 months.  It is a genre worth discovering because you never know the impact a person’s story can have on your own life.

book club · books · reading

Why I Love My Book Club

My book club is a place where I can seek refuge from the world for an hour once a month to have active and insightful conversations with the women who are part of it.  I like to think that the book club that I belong to is unique as our membership ranges in age from 40 to most recently, 94.  I love these women and what they bring to the club.

This past Saturday I attended the funeral of our leader Dorothy Johns.  She very recently bequeathed the title of leader to me as she became sicker with those things that plague a 94 year old person including poorer eyesight.  I was so humbled by this appointment and took it (and continue to take it) very seriously.  Dorothy was a force to be reckoned with. She was one of the kindest and compassionate people I had the privilege of knowing even if it was for a short time.

One thing we had in common was our passion for reading. Dorothy was a person who took the time to research the books we would be reading through our Hamilton Public Library spending hours researching the reviews of books and the author biographies. She often tried to incorporate best-sellers with Canadian authors into our list for the year.  This gave all of us the opportunity to read books we may have otherwise passed on while browsing the book shelves.

Being part of the this book club means a lot to me, as not only an avid reader, but a person who values the insight of the women who are part of it. Each woman brings a different perspective to the books we read including such first-hand accounts of living through the First World War.  Other women of the group have been incredibly candid discussing stillbirths and miscarriages as we read Call the Midwife.  For the one woman who shared her sorrow with us about her stillborn baby, it was the first time she had ever talked about her child openly.  There were a few tears shed that meeting.

Further the women in the group have worked in various professions including nursing, education and law.  They have lived through not only different decades but different centuries sharing what it was like to live through (and survive) The Great Depression in various parts of Canada and abroad in the 1930s.  They have lived to see segregation and Residential Schools be the norm of a society in the 1960s and beyond.  After reading Indian Horse by Richard Wagamese, it sparked an intense and lively conversation around Residential Schools in Canada and how finally, Canadians are speaking about this horrific event in our storied history. One of our members who is incredibly passionate about social justice issues spoke so passionately about the issue and what she remembers seeing and hearing as a child.  I was so moved by her thirst for justice.

Book Club has also been a great place to laugh out loud as we discussed some ridiculous characters from novels recently read or the antics of some of the memoirists  (Farley Mowat in Otherwise).  Book Club is a place where there are no walls.  We laugh freely, can debate fiercely and most of all, share our love of reading.

I hope I can make Dorothy proud by following her example.  I have some big shoes to fill.